Recent Changes

Sunday, December 8

  1. 9:51 pm
  2. page home edited ENGL 871/771 Digital Literature - Topics in Postmodern Lit –Summer 2012 Sherwood AT iup DOT edu …
    ENGL 871/771 Digital Literature - Topics in Postmodern Lit –Summer 2012
    Sherwood AT iup DOT edu
    Recent Tweets Summary
    Your browser does not support iframes.

    Daily Pages: Week 1 | Week 2 | Week 3 | Week 4 | Week 5
    Monday 7.2
    Tuesday (final presentations) 7.3
    ...
    on Tuesday.
    Organization
    Schedule Overview
    (view changes)
    9:50 pm

Monday, August 19

Thursday, May 9

Thursday, July 5

  1. page 7.3 edited ... 11. Jose Otero 12. Ry McGinnis 13. Rochelle Spencer
    ...
    11. Jose Otero
    12. Ry McGinnis
    13. Rochelle Spencer
    (view changes)
    8:05 am
  2. page Rochelle's CAP edited ... Chaucer worked for the nobles, including the king, almost all his life but in The Canterbury T…
    ...
    Chaucer worked for the nobles, including the king, almost all his life but in The Canterbury Tales his satire of the bourgeois remains sharp.
    And the great Shakespeare? The folios most likely wouldn’t exist had his plays not have been so incredibly commercially successful.
    ...
    say it. <--I apologize for this part of my argument. It lacked a critical voice and dissolved into an ad hominem attack against White. It wasn't my attention to be intellectually dishonest, but I felt strongly about this topic, for obvious reasons.
    Banard, John. “First Fruits or 'First Blights': A New Account of the Publishing History of Keats's Poems (1817).” Romanticism 12.2 (2006): 71-101.
    Gohdes, Clarence. L.F. “Whitman and Emerson.” Sewanee Review 37.1 (1929): 79-93.
    (view changes)
    8:04 am
  3. page Rochelle's CAP edited ... Still, the argument White presents in support of this view is disingenuous at best. For examp…
    ...
    Still, the argument White presents in support of this view is disingenuous at best.
    For example, it is noteworthy that in an essay about the “literary canon,” White must turn to music, for Chaucer and Shakespeare, who serve as the foundation of the English literary canon, were highly concerned with supporting the patrons who allowed them to create art.
    ...
    (Banard 71-76).
    White’s
    <--I realize after re-reading the article that White's view of Keats's career is similar to my own. Curtis writes that "of the Romantic poets, Keats was most keenly aware of this difficulty," and by "difficulty," I believe White means the difficulty of creating art without regard to what others, especially the important tastemakers, think of it.
    White’s
    essay thus
    ...
    logical flaw. <--I still believe White's argument is flawed, but now I think it is flawed not because of his argument that the artist be agnostic to his/her popularity but because he sees the Web as a recursive feedback loop of approval, which it, in fact, is not. The beginning of his own essay, in which White complains about how he felt some readers misread his essay, suggests that the Web offers more than just approval and "like." What the Web does is speed up people's ability to respond to a text--and most texts will have their share of supporters and detractors.
    Spenser’s Faerie Queene flattered his patron Queen Elizabeth, yet its allusions to destabilized gender identity (e.g., Britomart and Malocasta), its glorification of the pastoral, and its erotic undertones serve to question and critique the monarchy.
    Walt Whitman’s self-published Leaves of Grass has been called a work of “egoism” by at least one reader (Gohdes 79) yet we also see this collection as celebrating the spirit of American life.
    (view changes)
    8:02 am

Tuesday, July 3

  1. page Pat's Digital Poetry Re-mix Experiment edited http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UxKorxWiEA&feature=plcp
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UxKorxWiEA&feature=plcp
    (view changes)
    5:49 pm
  2. 6:01 am

More